New LiveCode in Old Bottles: WINE 1.9.2

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richmond62
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New LiveCode in Old Bottles: WINE 1.9.2

Post by richmond62 » Fri Feb 19, 2016 9:09 pm

LC 6.7.9 RC3, LC 7.1.2 RC3, LC 8.0 DP 14 all running extremely well on a Xubuntu 64-bit host under WINE 1.9.2

[ www.winehq.org ]

Displaying PNG images.

richmond62
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Re: New LiveCode in Old Bottles: WINE 1.9.2

Post by richmond62 » Sat Feb 20, 2016 10:58 am

The only real advantage I see in this is if one wants to get at the Dictionary easily while running Linux 64 bit.

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Re: New LiveCode in Old Bottles: WINE 1.9.11

Post by richmond62 » Sun Jun 12, 2016 10:27 am

Just installed Livecode 8.0.1 stable and 8.1 DP 1 Windows versions under WINE 1.9.11.

Both run perfectly.

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Re: New LiveCode in Old Bottles: WINE 1.9.2

Post by bogs » Mon Mar 20, 2017 9:24 pm

richmond62 wrote:The only real advantage I see in this is if one wants to get at the Dictionary easily while running Linux 64 bit.
I realize this is a bit older thread, but wanted to point out that actually, for a Linux user, there are a couple other advantages.

I don't know exactly what happens when you turn on that 'background' in mac or windows, but in linux it turns the whole back screen black(maybe other colors on different distros). This doesn't help if you have windows open in the background. If you run it through wine, you can set a 'virtual' desktop, and it will only cover the area directly in back of the IDE panels.

Along those lines, it can also give you a fair idea of what your program will look like on windows (not exact, but close enough). Wine allows you to change the os style from win95 through win8 (for the sake of this discussion, versions that LC will run on), if you've installed the fonts as well it gives a *very good approximation of what you can expect on a windows system.

Wine can install many versions in an easy to locate place that doesn't require modifications to your base system (some find this important).
It takes a lot less horsepower than a full blown vm.
If you use POL (Play on Linux) to do the install, you get all of the above + completely separated installs (sometimes handy, especially for rolling back).

I am sure there are many other things I am glossing over, those are the ones that came to the top of my mind.
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